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Depression : Don't be afraid

For a good chunk of this past year, I was suffering with depression.

Life felt thick and heavy. My motivation was at an all time low. I cried all the time. My parents were worried about me.

One of my best friends passed away, I went through a challenging breakup, and I’m more genetically prone to depression than a lot of people. I was in a multi-month funk and I could feel my brain’s reward centre being totally shut down. The things that used to make me happy didn’t make me happy anymore.

When I finally acknowledged that I was likely struggling with some ongoing situational depression, I went into research mode (as I do).

The data didn’t look good…

Apparently, treated (aka medicated) depressive episodes averaged 3-6 months in length, and untreated (non-medicated) depressive episodes lasted an average of 6-9 months.

Being as stubborn as I always am, I thought to myself, “I wasn’t included in this study. Those statistics don’t apply to me.”

For me, medication is always a last resort. I wanted to do whatever I could to cure my depression naturally, without drugs.

The following seven science-backed things are the highest leverage tools that I used to overcome my depression naturally in under a month. In fact, many of the following tips have been proven to be just as effective (if not MORE effective) than medication for depression.

(Side note: I’m not a doctor. Do your own research. Consult a doctor if you’re really worried. Some depressed people will need drugs to get out of their depressive episodes and that’s just fine).

7 Things You Can Do To Cure Your Depression Naturally


Spoiler alert: rubbing dandelions on your face is not one of the seven tips.
When you’re depressed, your motivation is at an all time low. It can be difficult to make yourself breakfast, or even get out of bed when you’re really in it.

Because of this, I’ve included a ‘seed habit’ tip in each section. The seed habit in each section is the easiest and most immediately actionable way to get yourself to engage in the behaviour, without having to overcome a major hurdle each time you lean into it. Think of it like your quick-start, easier-to-implement action step that you can take on today in order to get yourself on the fast track to feeling better.

1. Exercise

You’ve heard me harp on this point in at least a dozen other articles for a reason.

Exercise rewires/heals your brain, it boosts your self-esteem, and it releases endorphins, dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine (happy chemicals) that play an important part in regulating your brain’s functioning and your mood.

During my depression, I thought of exercising as my medication. I told myself that exercising at least three times per week was my non-negotiable, had-to-be-done thing. If I wasn’t going to try any drugs, then exercise would be my medicine.

Even if it feels absolutely ridiculous or pointless, just try it. Work up a sweat… you’ll feel better.

Exercise – seed habit: Enlist the help of a friend and go outside/to the gym/play sports a few times per week and you’ll feel slightly more human. By asking someone else to keep you accountable you’ll be that much more likely to actually do it. Make the exercise that you engage in something that you find moderately enjoyable and it’ll be that much more compelling.


Having just hiked a mountain with my dad.
2. Eat the right foods

If you eat nutrient-stripped, overly processed foods, you’re going to feel like shit. Garbage in, garbage out.

To the best of your ability, eat a diet loaded with vegetables, lean proteins, and fruit. Too much sugar, caffeine, alcohol/drugs, and (for some people) dairy and grains will lead to a lot of inflammation and bad/erratic moods. If you can’t muster up the energy to make your own nutrient-dense, home made meals, then ask a friend, family member, or significant other to make your meals for you.

(To be Continued)

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